The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)

The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (1966)
  • Time: 161 min
  • Genre: Adventure | Western
  • Director: Sergio Leone
  • Cast: Clint Eastwood, Lee van Cleef, Eli Wallach


During the American Civil War, three men set off to find $200,000 in buried gold coins. Zuco and Blondie have known each other for some time now having used the reward on Zuco’s head as a way of earning money. They come across a dying man, jack Carson, who tells them of a treasure in gold coins. By chance, he tells Zuco the name of the cemetery and tells Blondie the name of the grave where the gold is buried. Now rivals, the two men have good reason to keep each other alive. The third man, Angel Eyes, hears of the gold stash from someone he’s been hired to kill. All he knows is to look for for someone named Jack Carson. The three ultimately meet in a showdown that takes place amid a major battle between Confederate and Union forces.

One review

  • “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” has become the ultimate iconic film. Its broad images have become a staple for all that would eventually follow from Advertising, Pop Videos to future Western productions and Horror flicks. None can or want to escape the extraordinary visual flare and style of its Director. It is just too damn fashionable. Sergio Leone’s influence cannot be overstated.

    The exalted position of this Spaghetti Classic is #3 in the Top 250 films ever made according to The Internet Movie Data Base. Whether this position is justified is debatable but the good news is that this Classic Film was made over 41 years ago. The Top 250 list has proved somewhat unreliable because the latest Cinema Releases are voted on in greater numbers than the Classics of yesteryear and so it reflects a very modern bias. Substandard films like Martin Scorsese’s poor re-make “The Departed” or “The Bourne Ultimatum” have found themselves in the Top 100 relatively quickly.

    The positive of the IMDb Top 250 list is that it is constantly evolving and it also represents the general publics take on the medium. A crowd pleaser like “The Shawshank Redemption” has found itself consistently within the Top 5 and at present is at #2. That film found its audience not in the Cinema but by word of mouth and subsequent DVD sales.

    The problem as a whole is that the general public forgets the older Classic rather quickly because they hamper for the newest release. In some cases what is old is regarded with contempt.

    At a dinner in Hollywood I sat next to a famous producer and his beautiful doll-like wife. We began to talk about “The Good, the Bad and the Ugly” and what an impact it has had on modern cinema. His wife stopped our conversation with the subtly of shooting a blunderbuss into the air.

    “Why would you want to see that” she said, “its old!”

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